13th Annual Indigenous Farming Conference

August 26, 2015 | Comment

IMG_0698 Registration is now open!     

The Pathway to Healing

March 3-6th 2016

Maplelag Resort Callaway, MN

 

Draft Agenda: Scroll Down to see!

Registration of Event AND Hotel will be through us for only Thurs, Fri and Sat night.

Printable form for paying with Checks: RegistrationForm-IFC-2016 

Email: weseedlibrary@gmail.com

Article on the 12th Indigenous Farming Conference.

Featured Presenters

 Carolyn Raffensperger is a lawyer who seeks justice for future generations.  She is the executive director of the Science and Environmental Health Network and co-founder of the Women’s Congress for Future Generations.

Diane Wilson: Diane Wilson is an enrolled member of the Rosebud Reservation and the Executive Co-Director for Dream of Wild Health, a non-profit farm in Hugo, MN, that reconnects Native people with indigenous foods and medicines. Wilson has a B.A. in Political Science from the University of Minnesota and over 20 years working as senior management in various local nonprofit organizations.  Wilson is the author of two award-winning books that explore issues of assimilation, historical trauma, and cultural recovery:Spirit Car: Journey to a Dakota Past; and Beloved Child: A Dakota Way of Life. As a 2013 Bush Foundation Fellow, Wilson focused on indigenous seed preservation. Wilson is also a Master Gardener and a founding member of the Indigenous Seed Keepers Alliance.

Rowen White is a Seed Keeper from the Mohawk community of Akwesasne and a passionate activist for seed sovereignty. She is the director and founder of the Sierra Seeds, an innovative organic seed cooperative focusing on local seed production and education, based in Nevada City CA. She teaches creative seed training immersions around the country within tribal and small farming communities. She weaves stories of seeds, food, culture and sacred Earth stewardship on her blog, Seed Songs. Follow her seed journeys at www.sierraseeds.org

Sean Sherman: Chef Sean Sherman, Oglala Lakota, born in Pine Ridge, SD, has been cooking in MN, SD & MT for the last 27 years.  In the last few years, his main culinary focus has been on the revitalizing indigenous foods systems in a modern culinary context.  Sean has studied on his own extensively to determine the foundations of these food systems which include the knowledge of Native American farming techniques, wild food usage and harvesting, land stewardship, salt and sugar making, hunting and fishing, food preservation, Native American migrational histories, elemental cooking techniques, and Native culture and history in general to gain a full understanding of bringing back a sense of Native American cuisine to today’s world.

Tezozomoc is a community leader in South Central Los Angeles, as well as among agricultural workers displaced by modernization. He was a leader in the fight to save “The Garden”, the largest urban farm in the country. Following the bulldozing of The Garden, Tezozomoc organized a nonprofit organization (South Central Farmers Health and Education Fund) devoted to cooperative development for low-income, immigrant and refugee farmers. Tezozomoc is a member of the board of Acequia Institute, a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving biodiversity by saving indigenous plants and seeds, and a member of The Corn Collaborative, which organizes indigenous people around the sacred plant, Zea Mays.  Tezozomoc is fond of saying, “In the politics of impossibility, sometimes you win by losing. . .We won by losing, and we continue to win, planting hope along the way.”

 

Group Discussions –

Many times when attending a conference, participants wish to chat with like-minded people about a subject that is important to them. This will be going on throughout the conference. Two group discussions that are already in the works: Hannah Smith, and Shirley Nordrum’s discussion group and Tribal College Vistas discussion group

*There will be a sheet to facilitate your own discussion in the lounge area. Feel free to write you ideas for a discussion with a meeting place.

   

Room:

 

A – Healing our Community

Friday March 4th

B – Healing our Land

 

C – Our Plants are Medicine

8:00

BREAKFAST

Bob Shimek, Kim Anderson – Opening

9:15-10:15

Native Maize Breeding/Evaluation Project

To maintain and promote local food growing and seed saving, four tribal colleges and a plant breeder with the Northern Plains Sustainable Agriculture Society work together to determine the seed needs of Native communities, to increase the plant breeding capacity of Tribal College staff, and to begin seed increases and plant breeding following the stated desires of community members.

Robert Fox, Linda Hugelen, Frank Kutka

Wanuskewin’s Revitalizing Agriculture Project (RIAP):

Food and Plants as Medicine

Our project goal is to create a community of Indigenous growers who are dedicated to reclaiming Indigenous Food Systems through revitalizing harvesting and gardening traditions related to Indigenous food sovereignty and security. We will share how workshops, indigenous language, creation stories, and songs can be used to educate and increase the capacity of community members to revitalize and strengthen traditional practices of gardening and harvesting. Glenda Abbott

Ninesemaa (be my breath)/Asema (tobacco)

The presentation is an oral sharing of the Anishinaabe understanding of the origins of Asemaa and the manner of its use not only in ceremony but in daily living. In addition, I will share my insights in the growing of Asemaa.

Wilmer Noganosh

10:15-10:30

BREAK

10:30-12:00

Repatriating Indigenous Seeds

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum’s garden has been part of programming for the last 25 years. However, it has only been the last several years that it has been dedicated to Northeastern indigenous, non-GMO seeds. The Upper Midwest Indigenous Seed Keepers Network are also growing Indigenous seeds to their region with the Dream of Wild Health and WELRP.

Liz Charlebois, Diane Wilson, Zachary Paige

Tribal Cannabis: A Year in Review

Since the Department of Justice issued its memo on enforcement priorities addressing marijuana issues in Indian Country in late 2014, the topic of industrial hemp, medical cannabis and recreational adult use marijuana has garnered much attention from Tribes, Tribal enterprises, the marijuana industry and the media. Former North Dakota U.S. Attorney and Robins Kaplan partner Tim Purdon will provide perspectives on the past year’s developments, including what went right, what went wrong and the outlook going forward.

Tim Purdon, Robins Kaplan (American Indian Law and Policy Group)

 

Feeding our Indigenous DNA

What we’ve known all along about our bodies and food giving relatives. This presentation will include scientific insight into the importance of eating whole and Indigenous foods to assist our bodies to fend off diseases promoted through the “western” diet. Armed with this knowledge, we will also look at methods of getting more of these foods into our homes and the other places where we eat. Our true health lies within our DNA, our spirituality and our relationship with the earth. Jamie Holding Eagle, Joe Yracneta, Marcella Gilbert, Rachel Lindvall

12:00

12:20 – 1:00

LUNCH

Centeotl (Zea Mays): Sacred, Profane, and Prophetic – Tezozomoc will talk about work he is doing with indigenous Centeotl (Zea Mays) together with members of The Corn Collaborative.

1:00- 2:45

Break – Visiting, Seed Swap, Vendors & Booths. Silent Auction Opens. Group Discussions.

Ski rentals: 10$

 

Friday March 4th Afternoon/Evening

Room

Track

A

Healing our Community

B

Healing our Land

C

Our Plants are Medicine

2:45-3:45

How many Rabbits Did We Eat in a Year?

When we asked our Elders this question, we had some Aha moments. We started asking ourselves other questions about food like, why do we eat Bacon and Eggs for Breakfast? Let’s explore the story behind some of colonial America’s food culture.

Shirley Nordrum

 

Ceremony in Indigenous Agriculture

Learning to garden from traditional elders greatly influences our responsibilities to ceremony in agriculture. This talk will address how ceremony is very mush a part of gardening and will give examples of creating spiritual rituals in our gardens.

Terrylynn Brant

Food Value of the Three Sisters

This workshop examines the food produced by interplanted corn, bean and squash, a traditional agricultural system of the Haudenosaunee farmers likely harvested from their fields and show the numbers of people who could have been supported using this cropping system

Jane Mt. Pleasant

4-5:00

Make your Own Deodorant and Liquid Hand Soap – Room in lower level – Room 103

We are trying to live as chemical-free as we can and here is a great way to begin. Both of these are super easy to make at home with huge cost savings. Take your samples home. Lolly Aguilar

4-5:00

Indigenous Economics; Nourishing Sustainable Food and Seed Sovereignty Projects

Rowen will lead a discussion about the importance of indigenous economics within the creation and cultivation of Food and Seed Sovereignty programs. How are we nourishing and financially supporting our Food and Seed Sovereignty work without long term dependency on external funding sources?  How can we leverage our agricultural programs to be a rich wellspring for a revival for a new gift/trade economy?  We will discuss economic models that are in alignment with our indigenous cultural values, including innovative cooperatives.

Rowen White

Designing Educational Programs to Support Revitalizing our Traditional Food Cultures 

Join the conversation, as a community of traditional food knowledge holders, practitioners, activists and academics come, share and explore as we “workshop” ideas about what are the essential components and approaches that need to be included as we design programs and projects for revitalizing our respective community’s food traditions. Paula Anderson, from the Indigenous Environmental Studies/Science Program at Trent University will facilitate the workshop and be sharing what they have

been working on as well.

 Paula Anderson

Agriculture in the Andes

In 2003 Frank Kutka toured agricultural projects and historic sites in the high valleys and Altiplano of Bolivia and Peru.  He will present a visual tour of what Aymara and Quechua farmers from Cuzco to La Paz grow and how they have adapted their systems to their many ecological settings.

Frank Kutka

 

5:-5:30

Seed Swap. Visit Vendors and Booths. Silent Auction.

5:30 – 6:30

Keynote: Becoming Guardians of Future Generations:  Carolyn Raffensperger

How will future generations tell the stories of this generation as we faced dire threats to climate, water and food? Ancient ideas like care for the seventh generation can be forged into new policies that will enable us to become beloved ancestors. This will require innovation, vision and creativity as well as the wisdom of past. We begin that journey now.

6:30

DINNER

Family Activity: Popping rice and Dakota Black Popcorn in kitchen.

Storytelling after dinner facilitated by Mike Dahl in the Library (Room A)


Room

Track

A

Healing our Community

B

Healing our Land

C

Our Plants are Medicine

8:00

BREAKFAST

Announcements, Winona LaDuke – Opening

9:15-10:15

Myth and Life in the Meso-American Diaspora

This is a talk about the South Central Farmers and their struggle to preserve the largest U.S. farm back in 2013 and what diaspora, seeds, and culture hold together for Mesoamerican peoples.

Tezozomoc

Hands On Seed Stewardship Skills

This workshop will be an opportunity to delve deeper into the practical hands-on skills of seed stewardship, with a focus on harvest and production techniques.  Join us as we talk about the creative ways of re-integrating seed stewardship back into our local community food systems, and how we can deepen our understanding of the nourishing cycles of life.

Rowen White

Ancient Methods of Food Preservation and Making Medicines From the Foods You Grow

James and Rebecca Gawboy

 

10:15-10:30

BREAK

10:30-12:00

Making a Summer Salve: Stings, Scrapes, and Sunburn – Room in Lower Level, Room 102 Believe it or not, warm weather is coming. Along with it, are outdoor activities that make cuts, scrapes, burns, insect bites, and rashes a part of our daily lives. Come learn how to make a fantastic summer salve to heal all of these wounds! Limited amount of participants. Linda Black Elk

10:30-12:00

Growing Leaders in the garden: from a Tribal College perspective

This is an open discussion with tribal college and community seed keepers and gardeners on how leadership ignites and teaches the future generations in the practices of food as medicine.

Becca Dallinger, Brenda Weaver

Mentoring our Future: Traditional Farmers

We will discuss the importance of mentorship programming in indigenous communities and how our farmer to farmer mentorship program has been working for our collective, the Grand Canyon Trust Native America Program.

Teahonna James, Alicia Tsosie, Bill Preston

Historical Perspectives on Anishinaabe Agriculture:

Our ancestors provided gardened food for many families, and also for sale to non Indian markets. This is an opening into that history, and the return of our old varieties.

Winona LaDuke

12:00

12:25-12:45

12:45-1:15

LUNCH

Serving Hominy and Smoked Turkey Stew and Talk from the The Sioux Chef, Sean Sherman

Honoring Our Youth: Stories of Health and Healing

Native youth and staff from Dream of Wild Health Farm share their experience in “growing” youth leaders through programs that teach an indigenous approach to health and healing.

Diane Wilson, Estella LaPointe, Joseph Shabaiash, Trinity Wagner, Felicia Galvan, Wihinape Hunt

 

1:15– 2:45

Break – Visiting, Seed Swap, Vendors & Booths. Silent Auction Opens. Group Discussions.

Ski rentals: 10$

 

Saturday March 5th – Morning

 

Saturday March 5th – Afternoon/Evening

  

Room

Track

A

Healing our Community

B

Healing our Land

C

Our Plants are Medicine

2:45-3:45

Potatoes: keeping diversity in the field through participatory plant breeding

Potatoes come in a huge diversity of tastes, shapes, and colors, and are adapted to many different growing environments. We will discuss the practicalities of potato production at small and large scale, as well as skills and knowledge for selecting healthy seed potatoes and breeding new varieties. Ruth Genger

 

Native Pollinators

Native pollinators play a vital role in our gardening and farming operations. Learn who they are, what they do and how to invite these small but important relatives into our gardens and farms!

Danielle Lake Diver, Kaitlyn Grenier

Dream of Wild Health: Growing Youth Leaders
Learn from youth leaders and staff at Dream of Wild Health how youth farm programs develop leadership skills while supporting farm activities.

Diane Wilson, Estella LaPointe and DOWH Youth

4-5:00

*** Activity –  Craft from Corn – Lower level Room 102 ***

Join Terrylynn Brant and learn to make a pair of earrings and other projects to understand the basic methods for working with corn husk. Meeting Space will be announced at lunch.

 

4-5:00

Reconnecting Traditions into the Tribal Food Distribution System

Despite congressional efforts in recent years, federal nutrition programs have long ignored or even prohibited traditional foods.  Significant barriers still remain, but understanding the federal guidelines can allow introduction of these traditional foods into the commod, school lunch, and other federal feeding programs.  This presentation will cover the basics of those opportunities and other efforts to expand access to traditional foods.

Dan Cornelius

Treaties and Food Sovereignty in the United States

Article VI of the US Constitution states that the “Constitution, and the laws of the United States which shall be made in pursuance thereof; and all treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme law of the land.”  Join Dr. Martin Reinhardt as he works through an analysis of provisions included in multiple treaties made between the United States and American Indian tribes concerning food. Share your personal stories of how you have invoked your treaty rights in relationship to food.

Martin Reinhardt and Bob Shimek

Camping with Kookum

Join Kookum (Audrey Logan) as she tells the story of the 7 sisters of companion planting as they rebuild the soil after the great calamity of the Ice Age! Inspired by elders’ teachings plus many years of garden observations, this troupe from Winnipeg takes you on a multi media adventure that begs the question, ‘how can each of our gifts contribute to a better future?’

Audrey Logan, Anna Sigrithur, Natalie Elizabeth

5:15-6:00

Keynote: Honoring the Seeds of our Ancestors; Rowen White

Stories from the Indigenous Seed Sovereignty Movement

6:30

* BANQUET DINNER *

Indigenous Farming Conference Awards -Vendor Silent Auction Prizes

Music by SisterTree, Metis Traditional Jigging, Traditional Dancing

 

Sunday March 6th

 

A

Healing our Community

B

Healing our Land

C

Our Plants are Medicine

9:00-10:00

Brunch

10:00-11:00

Closing Remarks – Bob Shimek

11:00-12:00

Crafting, Visiting

12:00

Departure – End of a Good Time!!

 

Youth and Adult Craft Room Schedule

Lower Level of Maplelag

 

 

 

 

Times

Room

Friday

Saturday

9:15 – 10:00

102

*Youth Room Activities

*Youth Room Activities

10:10 – 11:00

103

Sacred Seed and Garden Power Quilt Making

Language Name Bracelet Making

 

102

 

@ 10:30 – Making a Summer Salve

11:10 – 12:00

103

Shoots – Fun to Eat and Grow

Sacred Seed and Garden Power Quilt Making

Part 2

12:00

 

Lunch

Lunch

1:00 – 2:45

102

Dream of Wild Health Food Demo

*Youth Room Activities

3:00 – 3:45

102, 103, 106

*Youth Room Activities (in rooms 102 and 103)

Storytelling through Yoga (in room 106)

4:00 – 4:45

103

Making Soap and Deodorant

Making Sunflower Seed Butter

 

102

*Youth Room Activities

Craft from Corn

5:00 – 5:45

103

*Youth Room Activities

*Youth Room Activities

5:45 – 6:30

102

*Youth Room Activities

*Youth Room Activities

7:15 on

Kitchen

Family Evening Activities

Popping Rice

Cornhusk Dolls

Youth Showcase